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Dynamic Neuro Stabilization

Dynamic Neuro Stabilization

Postioning of the diaphragm relative to the pelvic floor are key to trunk stabilization, resulting in more efficient movement. 

Postioning of the diaphragm relative to the pelvic floor are key to trunk stabilization, resulting in more efficient movement. 

Effective vs. Efficient:
    Although they can be synonymous they are not always the same.  When using the two terms while describing human movement they are rarely the same.  Many times we get things done without thinking about how efficient we are in the process.  Efficiency can also be somewhat subjective.  for example when on a road trip is it can be more efficient to be faster by using more gas to go faster or more gas efficient to go slower requiring less gas.  With human movement its pretty straight-forward, effort!  Not every movement is the same therefore you can train everyone to be efficient for everything.  A shorter person, regardless of training, will never be quite as fast as a taller person in the pool, all else being equal, its just physics.  We can, however, train efficiency on a person to person basis to more efficient in general.  The side effect of this efficiency is improved function and health.  Whether you're an athlete or a "weekend warrior" efficient movement patterns allow you to enjoy your chosen activities more.  Less time catching your breath and more time enjoying the scenery.  

The Prague School's approach to Trunk stability is based on 60+ years of clinical application.  They have worked with numerous international weightlifting programs producing dozens of medalists in that time.

The Prague School's approach to Trunk stability is based on 60+ years of clinical application.  They have worked with numerous international weightlifting programs producing dozens of medalists in that time.

    Like any other system, efficiency starts with a good foundation.  A good foundation for quality, efficient human movement is a stable trunk or core.  Although this may seem cliche, in this case its a new take on an old concept.  This is because of the starting point.  Most people think core stability starts with sit-ups or planking.  These are nice but they aren't the foundation.  The foundation is in the breath or the diaphragm to be exact!  Without proper breathing patterns, by that I mean expansion of the diaphragm into the abdomen, you cannot properly stabilize the lumbar spine or the trunk.  Second to that is a loss of stability in the extremities.  When you lose stability you become inefficient in your movement.  Peripheral stabilization is then required, recruitment of other muscles.  In other words, when unstable you use 2x the energy to accomplish the same action as someone with proper stabilization.  Do you think these world champion weight lifters squat 1200 pounds without stability and efficiency?  HECK NO!! 

movement rehabilitation is based on human developmental stages.  

movement rehabilitation is based on human developmental stages.  

    So if you are one of the thousands of folks out there that can't seem to get rid of that nagging low back, upper back, neck pain, etc.; perhaps its time to stop the insanity (def. insane: repeating the same action and expecting different results) and get properly assessed and learn how to be more efficient.  Pain shouldn't be a part of your every day routine.  If it feels like you aren't as energetic as you used to be, maybe its not "low T" or old age, maybe its inefficiency?  You're wasting half your mental and physical resources just trying to stabilize!?  I'm here to help, make an appointment and lets talk about what you want to improve!

 

Hot vs. Cold

Hot vs. Cold

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   People are regularly asking me what to use, heat or ice?  So I thought I'd take this time to give a little feedback, for the record.  Before I do, I need to explain a thing or two.  First, There is no research that has definitively linked heat or ice to any significant change in recovery.  Considering that most research design has an inherent flaw, some more flawed than others, there is just as much research supporting hot/cold therapy as there is refuting it.  Most research suggest neither manage to effect tissue more than 1/8-1/2" deep, the skin is normally about 1 sheet of paper thick.  There will be body parts it can be more effective than others, ankle v. gluteals, but overall the research is inconclusive.  Secondly, considering that half the game is in the athletes head, if you think it helps..... IT HELPS!! haha!  Seriously though, this isn't the only treatment out there that science has failed to confirm or deny that is still widely used.  So with that said if you like to take contrast baths after a big game to prep for the next game, be my guest.  One thing science hasn't done is prove it hurts to ice or contrast!  So if it provides you a mental edge, then don't hesitate!  I know I used to do it all the time when playing, I'll be the last person to tell you "stop".   So with that said, on to the point of this article.

There are numerous forms of heat that can be useful.  Just make sure to be aware of too much heat.  Too much can cause burns that can complicate your achy muscles.

There are numerous forms of heat that can be useful.  Just make sure to be aware of too much heat.  Too much can cause burns that can complicate your achy muscles.

     Heat should only be used on a subacute injury (old or chronic injuries) before activity.  Heat is something you would use to start the day or before your workout.  The body responds to heat by sending more blood to the area, through vascular dilation, increasing blood flow to the area.   The additional blood to the area helps increase the core temperature of the muscles of the area of application.  The increased muscle temperature helps to prevent muscle damage like strains and/or tears.  Its the same principle behind dynamic stretching.  They both are used to increase blood flow to the area.  With increased blood flow comes increased temperature and increased elasticity.  To get a nice visual, try taking 2 rubber bands, freeze one and put the other in a warm water bath then try stretching them and see which one snaps first.  Although a little exaggerated, this is very similar to how your muscles work.  cold muscles are fragile and warm ones are responsive and adaptive, which is key in injury prevention.

Old school bags of ice cubes or frozen veggies are out of style these days with all the different colds packs made these days but they can be expensive and don't work any better than your "old reliable"!

Old school bags of ice cubes or frozen veggies are out of style these days with all the different colds packs made these days but they can be expensive and don't work any better than your "old reliable"!

     Ice should be applied at the end of the day when all activity is completed.  Ice will aid in lower the core temperature of the muscles/joint over the area applied.  Cold causes vascular constriction in the area of application, this reduces the amount of blood that makes it to the area.  This is the bodies response to cold in an effort to maintain core body temperature, much like when you are outside in the winter and you feel fine but your fingers and toes go numb.  Its the bodies natural response for staying alive.  The use of ice helps decrease inflammation in the area.  Its especially helpful in the event of an acute injury (new), like an ankle sprain, to prevent/limit secondary injury due to excessive swelling.  With a new injury tissues are torn, including capillaries, causing blood to flood into the muscle compartments.  If the swelling is left unchecked it can overfill these compartments resulting in rupture of the fascial dividers and further injury.  It can also cause compression of other structure restricting blood flow and sensation, which can lead to necrosis (death) of compressed tissue (muscle and nerves alike) if left long enough.  It's imperative to make sure the PRICE (Protect, Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate) guidelines are implemented immediately following injury.  Here's a general rule of thumb for ice usage is 20/40 (20-minutes on followed by 40-minutes off) with compression till bedtime.  Some people like to use contrast baths for recovery.  As mentioned above, the research is inconclusive but if that's part of your routine and you feel it helps, by all means, keep it up!

    I hope this was useful.  Please don't hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns.  Hope to see you soon on the field or in the office.  Until then take care and best of luck!  Cheers!

The Importance of Your Diaphram

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Do you know what your Diaphragm muscle is, or where and what it does?  So that we are all on the same page, its the muscle separating the intestines from the lungs.  a thin sheet of muscle attached at the bottom of the ribs that's designed to be the primary muscle for respiration.  On inhale it pushes down into the belly and on exhalation is pulls back up into the chest forcing the air from the lungs.  You know what else it does...... CORE STABILITY!! If you are not a belly breather, most of us are not, One of the biggest and best core muscles isn't being utilized which will eventually lead to core instability and low back or pelvic dysfunction.  So how do you work that particular muscle, I know I've never seen a "diaphragm" station in the gym!! Breath, yes, just breath! Lay flat on the floor with your legs elevated and just breath in and out of the stomach.  On a side note, if you have a problem with acid reflux, this may help with that as well.  The cardiac sphincter, meant to prevent acid backflowing into the esophagus is connected to the diaphragm.  If the diaphragm is weak would it not make sense the cardiac sphincter could be weak as well?  So if you get the diaphragm working right you could in-turn, stifle your acid reflux.