Although this is what we are conditioned to aim for with physical fitness, its not actually good long term.

Although this is what we are conditioned to aim for with physical fitness, its not actually good long term.

      A quick thought about what most people know as "core stability". How many of you out there are familiar with the constant battle between form and function? To put it another, simpler way: Looks versus functionality! AHHHHH, yes!! Pretty sure EVERYBODY is familiar with this one! Girls, those high heels you LOVE to wear out on a hot date but almost invariably end the night carrying them instead of wearing them...... Yes they LOOK amazing, but it doesn't take long to find out they aren't very functional! Guys, Those big trucks we like to drive sure look nice until you do the math on the petrol bill! So heres another one I think is very commonly overlooked when it comes to exercising and core training.
     

Competitive weightlifters are a great example of stable core.  Instead of that "hour glass" figure they are more like a rigid cylinder the same diameter top to bottom.  This shape is the most functional in terms of a stable core and there low back and extremities.

Competitive weightlifters are a great example of stable core.  Instead of that "hour glass" figure they are more like a rigid cylinder the same diameter top to bottom.  This shape is the most functional in terms of a stable core and there low back and extremities.

So according to all the magazines a strong core would look something like a six pack with that nice little "V" starting at the waist line going down into the groin area. Yes, it is very appealing to the eye and considered a good look by most. The reality: it's just "window dressing" and from the functional rehab standpoint indicates core INSTABILITY! This look indicates that you do a great job working your rectus abdominus muscles (the 6-pack muscles) and an even better job ignoring the rest of your abdominals! If your wondering what this actually means; you're only working 2 of the 8 abdominal muscles (4 on each side). It doesn't take an engineer to recognize the eventual problems when only 25% of the stabilizers are used to support a structure! Now don't take that to mean that everybody that has a six pack is gonna get hurt, rather when you DO experience some sort of pain/dysfunction a possible explanation is that due to core instability everything else (arms and legs) are unstable as well. After all, all movement starts must start with a solid anchor and for the human body the core is the anchor for our extremities.
If there are any questions I encourage you to make an appointment (multiple options) so we can discuss any concerns you may have.